Texas Legislature to OER Community: Where are you?

Last week I had the chance to chat with Rep. Scott Hochberg, a Texas legislator from Houston who has been heavily involved in getting OER policy passed in his state. He’s had remarkable success with bills like H.B 2488. This bill, in particular, has allowed the state board of education, which creates the approved instructional materials list for Texas, to include OER on that list. This is only POTENTIALLY impactful policy because, while school districts have authority to use OER, there has not been a lot of motivation to use it or go looking for it. It’s inefficient to have 1000 school districts looking for and approving OER.

As Rep. Hochberg explained it, the problem is that the OER community (especially producers of OER directed at K-12 audiences) do not seem too interested in getting involved in processes where they have to do something to get materials approved. In fact, traditional publishers have continued to have great success in Texas, despite all policy doors being open for OER. One of the reasons traditional model continues to dominate is because there are strong economic reasons for traditional materials publishers to jump through all the hoops. For instance, there is a big profit motive for Pearson to submit its textbooks. The same motivations are not there for OER producers. Thus, if you’re an administrator and you have Pearson knocking on your door and showing you stuff (which, by the way, is already approved by the state board), then OER becomes less appealing – even though it’s cheaper and possibly of equal or better quality.

In the end, Rep. Hochberg expressed his frustrations with the OER community not doing more to “get in the faces” of potential OER adopters at the K-12 level in Texas. There is so much potential in Texas right now. At least one policymaker is crying out for the OER community to take advantage of it!

2 thoughts on “Texas Legislature to OER Community: Where are you?

  1. A moment after I published this post @SalientResearch tweeted the following: Bad joke? Minnesota’s Office of #HigherEd bans Coursera, no “authorization from the state” – few OERs have. bit.ly/XuTBux #OpenEd12

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