The Birth of OER Policy

In our vigor to advocate for open educational resources and policies that support their development, it would be wise to keep in mind some fundamental things about policy and the policymaking process itself.

1. OER policies should solve more problems than they create. Indeed, policy is “a set of answers to questions, a series of solutions to problems” (Cooper et al., 2004, p. 63)

2. The problems solved by OER and its related policies should be clearly defined and explained. “If a policy issue is not well-defined, it will not be perceived as important, making it difficult to attract enough attention to reach the policy agenda” (Fowler, 2004, p. 167).

3. Policies related to OER should come with solutions attached. “Even if policymakers want to address a problem [such as the rising costs of education], absent a proposed solution or plan of action, the problem cannot be addressed…[Some even] argue that public officials will not take a problem seriously unless there is a proposed course of action attached to it” (Cooper et al., p. 65).

4. The policymaking process is NEVER objective or ideologically neutral. “Before a policy choice can be made, a problem in society must have been accepted as part of the agenda of the policymaking system–that is, as a portion of the range of problems deemed amenable to public action and worthy of the attention of policymakers” (Peters, 1986, p. 39). What’s more, “cultural values, interest group advocacy, scientific information, and professional advice all help to shape the content of problem definition” and the policymaking process itself (Rochefort & Cobb, 1994, p. 4).

5. New OER policies should be clearly tied to older, related policies. “The more a new issue can be made to look like an old issue, the more likely it is to be placed on an agenda” (Peters, 1986, p. 47).

6. Advocates of OER policy should understand and use the power of the media (new and old) to shape policy. “Media influence on the process and content of policies varies according to type of issue, stage of process, time frame, and political and media systems. Under certain circumstances, the media can be a crucial player. It depends on what is covered, how often, and how it is framed” (Paletz, 1998, p. 234).

7. The language of policy can be as important as the policy itself. “Social” rhetoric and symbolism should be used in advocating for OER policies. “To heighten participation, issues may be connected to sweeping social themes, such as justice, democracy, and liberty” (Rochefort & Cobb, 1994, p. 5). And, “the more closely a particular problem can be linked to certain important national [or international] symbols, the greater its probability of being placed on the agenda” (Peters, 1986, p. 48).

8. OER policy reform should be influenced, if not led, by people with expertise in education. “What is significant about much of the interest group activity [in educational policymaking], and what distinguishes it from previous activism, is the prominence of non-educators leading the reform efforts” (Cooper et al. 2004, p. 76).

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